Apples, Sansa

Apples, Sansa are a Japanese developed early apple.

Apples, Sansa

Apples, Sansa

About Sansa Apples:

Sansa apples are a very delicious, sweet-tart early apple, and as with most early apples they should be eaten right after harvest and refrigerated to preserve their freshness. Their taste is similar to that of a Gala apple. Sansa apples originated in 1969 when a Japanese researcher, Dr. Yoshio Yoshida, sent pollen from the Akane variety to his colleague in New Zealand, Dr. Don McKenzie, and asked him to use it to cross-pollinate Gala blossoms, which were not grown in Japan, and Akane were not grown in New Zealand.

The seeds that resulted from the cross were returned to Japan, where the young trees were grown until they produced fruit, but it wasn’t until 1988 when they were first marketed. Now they are grown in the United States. We purchased these apples from a farm store in Columbia County, New York in 2015. We could not find any specific nutritional information for sansa apples.

Previous Fruit: http://veganvenue.org/apples-royal-gala/
Next Fruit: http://veganvenue.org/apples-tydeman/

Some background information:

Over the years, people have been asking us, “What do vegans eat?” This is probably because they first think about a flesh product as the main meal. After that they then think about everything else as a side dish. So, we began publishing the huge variety of plant foods that are available for us to eat in this section of our web site. Additionally, we are always on the lookout for something new to add to our collection. This way we can experiment with to incorporate into our meals. We have also found that eating mostly unprocessed plant foods make us much more healthy. It’s a great way to live and our foods provide almost all of our vitamins.

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